Welcome to Fiji

This is an all inclusive liveaboard dive trip aboard the Island Dancer II.

Fiji Island Dancer Deluxe Master
Jan 3, 2015 – Jan 2, 2016 $2995 $3195
Jan 2, 2016 – Jan 7, 2017 $3095 $3295
Jan 7, 2017 – Jan 6, 2018 $3195 $3395
Jan 7, 2018 – Jan 5, 2019 $3295 $3495

 

Orientation program actions

Day 1 Guests will fly in and out of Suva Nausori Airport (SUV)
Embarkation is at 11:00 and snacks are served upon boarding followed by the Captain’s briefing and dinner later that evening.
Day 2-7 Experience the best that Fiji Islands has to offer.
Day 8 Check out is Saturday morning at 7:30 am.

PACKAGE INCLUDES

  • 7 nights on the boat  (accommodation in deluxe cabins or master cabins with accessories, diving, full board, including soft drinks)
  • diving guide
  • transfers

PACKAGE DOES NOT INCLUDE

  • Anything not mentioned above
  • Gratuity
  • meals not mentioned
  • personal expenses

Price is per person including taxes, min. 2 divers

Fiji

Throughout the week aboard the Island Dancer II guests will depart Suva to explore the reefs, bommies and walls of Nigali Pass, Wakaya, Koro and Namenalala Islands. Known as the soft coral capital, the brilliant colors on display will dazzle even the most experienced divers and photographers. Drift dives with eagle rays, mantas, turtles, sharks and giant groupers are also on the itinerary.

Clownfish, pygmy seahorses, ornate ghost pipefish, and a multitude of nudibranchs bring smiles to every dive! With direct flights from several major cities worldwide, it is an easy destination to add to your dive log.

To top off the exiting diving and experience some of Fiji’s local culture, a visit to a Fijian village on one of the remote islands is arranged including a Kava ceremony and warrior dance. All guests are required to wear a traditional sulu (sarong or wrap) so either bring your own or we will gladly provide one for you!

The Island Dancer II appeals to those discriminating divers who prefer a smaller group and is perfectly suited for Fiji and the diving itinerary. All indoor areas are air-conditioned and each of the guest cabins feature ensuite facilities. The beautifully appointed salon has ample room for divers to view their photos and videos or to enjoy a movie on the entertainment system. The sundeck features covered and uncovered lounging and is a perfect place to relax with a book during surface intervals.

 

Fiji

A blacktip reef shark chasing butterfly fish in the shallow clear water of the lagoon of Bora Bora an island in the Tahiti archipelago French Polynesia.

Getting There, Passports & Visa Documentation:
Republic of the Fiji Islands is an island nation in the South Pacific Ocean east of Vanuatu, west of Tonga and south of Tuvalu. The country occupies an archipelago of about 322 islands, of which 106 are permanently inhabited, and 522 islets. The two major islands, Viti Levu and Vanua Levu account for 87% of the population.

Many major airlines fly into Nadi: Air Pacific, Air New Zealand, American Airlines. Connecting flights on Sun Pacific to Suva are available. Recommended Hotels: Novotel (Suva), Raffles Gateway (Nadi), Beqa Lagoon (Pacific Harbor – close to Suva), The Pearl South Pacific (Pacific Harbor.

Visitors must have a current passport, adequate funds to support themselves, and a return airline ticket. US citizens require a passport that must be valid for 6 months from date of entry. It is the travelers’ responsibility to ensure they have the proper visa to travel into each country on his or her itinerary as well as for re-entry and return to their country. Since regulations vary by country, contact your consulate or embassy of your country for the requirement.

The Island Dancer II operates out of Suva, Fiji. A group transfer from the airport to the Island Dancer II is provided to guests flying into Suva Nausori Airport (SUV) on the scheduled day of embarkation. This transfer to the yacht, which is about a 45 minute drive, is scheduled between 6 – 8am.

If you are arriving in Suva on a later flight and unable to join the group transfer, then you will need to take a taxi to the Island Dancer II which docks next to the Novotel Hotel (formerly the Trade Winds hotel). If you are already in Suva, please make your way to the Island Dancer II anytime after 12 pm The Island Dancer II typically sails immediately. Check out is Saturday morning at 7:30 am.

           
Duration: We offer 6 night and 7 night trips. Boarding is at 4 pm and check out is at 8 am. Dinner is not included the last night of the trip, however, there is a restaurant at Old Bahama Bay resort.

Taxes & Fees:
Park Fee $14.69 and $200 VAT taxes (paid onboard).
Note: All purchases onboard are subject to 20% VAT tax.

 

Diving Environment:
  • Known for brilliant soft corals, sharks, turtles, mantas, anemones, clownfish, and multiple macro critters
  • Dives from mothership and or tender
  • Water temperature:
  • Nov – April (Fijian summer) 80-84F (27-29C)
  • May – Oct (Fijian winter) 76-79F (25-27C)
  • 3-5 mm wetsuit recommended

Island Dancer II

The Island Dancer II appeals to those discriminating divers who prefer a smaller group and is perfectly suited for Fiji and the diving itinerary. All indoor areas are air-conditioned and each of the guest cabins feature ensuite facilities. The beautifully appointed salon has ample room for divers to view their photos and videos or to enjoy amovie on the entertainment system.

The yacht has comfort in mind and is a perfect place to relax with a book during surface intervals. Following the standards of the Dancer Fleet®, the Island Dancer II replicates the Dancer Fleet service, amenities and the highest standards of safety in the industry.

Throughout the week aboard the Island Dancer II, an intimate 10 passenger yacht, guests will depart Suva to explore the reefs, bommies and walls of Nigali Pass, Wakaya, Koro and Namenalala Islands. Known as the soft coral capital, the brilliant colors on display will dazzle even the most experienced divers and photographers. Drift dives with eagle rays, mantas, turtles, sharks and giant groupers are also on the itinerary.

Clownfish, pygmy seahorses, ornate ghost pipefish, and a multitude of nudibranchs bring smiles to every dive! With direct flights from several major cities worldwide, it is an easy destination to add to your dive log.

To top off the exciting diving and experience some of Fiji’s local culture, a visit to a Fijian village on one of the remote islands is arranged including a Kava ceremony and warrior dance. All guests are required to wear a traditional sulu (sarong or wrap) so either bring your own or we will gladly provide one for you!

The Island Dancer II appeals to those discriminating divers who prefer a smaller group and is perfectly suited for Fiji and the diving itinerary. All indoor areas are air-conditioned and each of the guest cabins feature ensuite facilities. The beautifully appointed salon has ample room for divers to view their photos and videos or to enjoy a movie on the entertainment system. The sundeck features covered and uncovered lounging and is a perfect place to relax with a book during surface intervals

Accommodations:
Double Bed (lower) and Twin Bed (upper) bunks, Private Facilities, Mirrored Cabinet, Wardrobe, Bathrobes, Hairdryer, Toiletries, Fresh Towels Daily.

Queen Bed, Private Facilities, Picture Window View, Mirrored Cabinet, Wardrobe, Bathrobes, Hairdryer, Toiletries, Fresh Towels Daily

Diving:

Diving from Island Dancer II is easy- it is a mix & match of diving from the sea level dive platform that runs the width of the transom of the Island Dancer II, of sometimes a short tender ride (5 mins max) to the dive site with a drift back to Island Dancer II for your safety stop and easy re-boarding by the large dive deck ladder and occasionally from the dive platform on Island Dancer II with pick up by tender for return to Island Dancer II- this is all dependent on tidal (current) conditions at each different dive site.

Gau Island-

  • Jim’s Alley: consists of 3 large bommies that start at about 15 fee from the surface and drop to the floor at about 60 to 70 feet. The bommies are covered in soft and hard corals, sea fans, whips and anemones. This sight also frequently has white tips, turtles, barracudas and an occasional ray.
  • Ningali Pass: is a small cut in the reef tha can only be dove 1 1/2 hours before low water to 1 1/2 hours after low water, otherwise the visibility is poor and the current can exceed 4 knots. At this sight we see large grouper/jew fish, barracuda, big eyed jacks, snapper, big gray reef sharks and an occasional sea snake. We also have seen eagle rays, mantas and hammerhead sharks.

Island of Koro-

  • Black Rock Caverns: in the mouth of Dere Bay and the host of many swim-throughs, caverns and caves. This is also one of our favorite night dive sights that is the host to large file fish, many decorator crab, white tips, flashlight fish, eels and occasionally squid. This site also has a large school of barracuda. It is in the lee of the island of Koro and can be dove most any time during the year but visibility is usually limited to 60 feet.
  • Koro Gardens: is marked by a single large bommie that comes to within 15 feet of the surface. The area around the bommie is about 45 feet to the bottom and drops off to 95 feet in some areas. Hard corals cover everything while an abundance of reef fish crowd the waters and make the diving spectacular.
  • Shark Fin Point is on the north east point of Koro Island can be action central. On most dives you will see a large school of about 500 barracudas, eagle rays, many white tip, lots of grey reefs, lobster, eels, and they have even seen whale shark here. Not only are the fish and shark abundant but it’s covered in both hard and soft corals. When the tide is running this can be a most enjoyable drift dive because little effort is needed to move and it seems as if the show just swims by you.

Makongi Island- At the turn of the centrury Makongi island was the home of the last leper colony in Fiji but today it’s the homeo f the Fijian turtle and clam farm. The north end of the island is protected by a barrier reef which has a lot of great dive sites. The foremost popular are White Rock, Rustic Arch, Coral Garden and Makongi Channel. Each of these sights has wide variety of bright indigenous little fish.

  •  Coral Gardens: is a series of bommies that have a beautiful supply of hard and soft corals. This sight also has turtles, white tip sharks, moray eels, lion fish and once in awhile a nurse shark. Visibility can sometimes be below 40 feet because of heavy plankton.
  • E-6 & Hi-8: These two sites are aptly named : “E-6″ for the amount of film shot at this site and likewise “Hi-8″ for the amount of video footage taken. Both E-6 and Hi-8 are pinnacles that start at a depth of 3,000 feet and rise to the surface. E-6 has a horseshoe shaped grotto which is filled with anemones, large clams, lionfish and spectacular sea fans and soft corals. Each has a virtual smorgasbord of soft corals, hard corals, sea fans, sea anemones, octicoral, swim-throughss and are teeming with smaller fishes of the South Pacific. Included at both sights are sweet lips, hammer heads, white tips, occasional silver tips and if we’re lucky, a whale.
  • Makongi Channel: is most often a drift dive due to the fact its at an entrance to the iner reef. On an incoming tide the visiiblity is quite good and sometimes exceeds 100 feet. The usual party of Makongi sea life abounds here in the channel as well.
  • Rustic Arch: was discovered by photo pro Rusty Madsen during an exploration trip in Feb. 98. This sight has excellent hard and soft corals, sea fans, sea anemones, lion fish, moray eels, white tips and a recently discovered home to a large Napoleon wrasse.
  • White Rock: is at the entrance of Makongi channel and aptly called because the waves always break on it causing the reef to have a white cap. This sight has white tips, occasionally eagle rays and mantas, eels, large file fish, an abundance of hard and soft corals but most of all it has the friendliest school of fuseliers.
Namena (Namenalala Island)- The Namena barrier reef stretches a distance of over 10 miles. There is an abundance of dive sights here but many are unprotected in open waters and can’t be dove in bad weather. Most of these sites have the possibility of high currents and as a result the sea life here is abundant and very active. It is not uncommon to see gray reefs, white tips, silver tips, barracuda and dog tooth tuna on a 30 minute dive. The following ar the most popular dive sites.
  • Chimneys: is three slender bommies which start at about 74 feet and come to within 10 feet of the surface. On the sandy bottom you’ll find a field of garden eels with govies and shrimp scattered throughout. Everywhere in the bommies of this site you can find pipe fish, cleaner fish, nudibranches, soft corals, hard corals, sea anemones with clown fish, and free swimming in the current above the bommies are unicorn fish and anthiest. Between the bommies in midwater are resident barracudas and it’s not uncommon to see white tips or grey reefs.
  • Magic mound: is a single bommie 80 to 100 feet long and 30 to 40 feet wide. It starts at 80 feet on one side and comes up to within 15 feet of the surface. It’s covered in hard corals, soft corals, sea anemones, sea fans and lots of lionfish lurking in between or hanging around under ledges. This sight is also known for its white tips and grey reef action.
  • North Save-a-Tack: is on an incoming tide where the action is fast and furious. A diver must descend to a depth of 70 feet in water that often has a visibility of over 150 feet. On the bottom a diver may see grey reefs, white tips, barracudas and dog tooth tuna with an occasional silver tip without even moving. The current is strong and during an incoming tide and the visibility is excellent. Divers normally start on the east side of North Save-a-Tack and end their dive on the west side among the hard and soft coral covered bommies. This side is excellent for macro and wide angle shots.
Wakaya Island-
  • Gem Stone: is on the outside edge of Wakaya passage. This is a wall dive with swim throughs, hard and soft corals and as one guest who has dove around the world said, this sight is as good as they have in the Red Sea. Mantas also frequently visit this location along with hammer head and white tip sharks. When diving this location on a night dive the light fish here are very abundant and make for a great light show.
  • Golden Rock: is a bommie that starts at 35 ft. on the high inside edge it then comes up to 10 ft. and is 20 ft. across. This site has soft coral, hard coral, cleaner shrimp, blue ribbon eels, lionfish, and most important it is a cleaning station for mantas. They see mantas here 90% of the time.
  • Sand Point: is a wall dive between the island of Wakaya and Mokongi. On this dive we frequently see mantas, eagle rays, turtles, white tips and the various colorful fish of the South Pacific in abundance along with hard and soft corals.Wakaya Pass starts at about 35 ft. sandy bottom then you swim out over a wall and turn to the left. As you come over the drop off of the wall you can look straight down to about 140 ft. While swimming along the wall you may see blue ribbon eels, White tip, Nurse, and Hammerhead sharks along with mantas, Marble Rays, Turtles, Eagle rays and Barracudas.

podpis